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We, the willing, led by the unknowing, are doing the impossible for the ungrateful. We have done so much for so long with so little, we are now capable of doing anything with nothing. – Unknown

Read my about me before following me.


Anonymous asked: you're sexy.. in the way that makes me bite my lip when you post pictures of yourself.


Answer:

— 8 seconds ago
http://sexecutive-outcums.tumblr.com/post/83692021916/coreyliftsworld-45-70govt →

coreyliftsworld:

45-70govt:

thearmedgentleman:

cerebralzero:

556operateitfagget:

>Points to Mosin Nagant

Person: OMG YOU OWN A GUN BUT IT COULD KILL SOMEONE IT COULD KILL ME OMG

Me: Are you a fascist?

Person: No

Me: Then you are safe

image

>points at Suomi

— 4 minutes ago with 224 notes
In 24 hours I’ll be 21.

victran:

theonus:

Jesus Christ.

This is about to be an awesome and horrible weekend all at the same time.

right now

image

24 hours later

image

image

the weekend

image

image

image

image

the next morning

image

image

— 6 minutes ago with 35 notes
*Turn Down For What echoes ominously in the distance*
— 17 minutes ago with 1 note
In 24 hours I’ll be 21.

buttsquadron:

theonus:

Jesus Christ.

This is about to be an awesome and horrible weekend all at the same time.

Holy shit man I just turned 21 today. Drink well and have fun, aight?

Dude. Happy Birthday. You too, brother bear.

— 18 minutes ago with 35 notes
In 24 hours I’ll be 21.

Jesus Christ.

This is about to be an awesome and horrible weekend all at the same time.

— 20 minutes ago with 35 notes
hoplite-operator:

Glock 34 slow motion

We use G34’s for most of our steel challenge stuff. 
But jesus.. This is painful to watch. So wobbly. No recoil mitigation.
AND IT NEVER STOPS.

hoplite-operator:

Glock 34 slow motion

We use G34’s for most of our steel challenge stuff.

But jesus.. This is painful to watch. So wobbly. No recoil mitigation.

AND IT NEVER STOPS.

(via danthemedicman)

— 22 minutes ago with 90 notes
refactortactical:

Airborne!

There is nothing in the world like this.

refactortactical:

Airborne!

There is nothing in the world like this.

(via shuttster)

— 1 hour ago with 83 notes

This is Omaha Beach, Easy Green sector.

I stood on this beach 67 years after my Great-Grandfather stormed it with the 16th RCT. In the third picture I stood at the waters edge and stared at the 100m long beachhead. It was high tide though and our tour guide said that when they assaulted at low tide, the beachhead was nearly 200m long.

Finally, Pawpaw made it to the “seawall”; a small mound of sand not even knee high. In front of him was a hill crawling with entrenched Nazis. Our guide pointed to where the MG nests were supposed to be and all I could do was ponder how horrid the beach must have been.

From that day forward, I knew I would never be the man my great grandfather was. But goddammit, I knew I would give it everything.

I just wish he would’ve lived long enough to see me make it to West Point or earn my jump wings. I know he would’ve been proud.

— 2 hours ago with 57 notes
#gunblr  #DDay  #Omaha  #love you pawpaw 

todayinhistory:

June 6th 1944: D-Day

On this day in 1944, the D-Day landings began on the beaches of Normandy as part of the Allied ‘Operation Overlord’. It was the largest amphibious military operation in history. 155,000 Allied troops landed in France and quickly broke through the Atlantic Wall and pushed inland. In charge of the operation was General Dwight Eisenhower and leading the ground forces was General Bernard Montgomery. It was a decisive Allied victory and a key moment in the Second World War as the Allies gained some ground on the continent following the fall of France to the Nazis in 1940.

“You are about to embark upon the great crusade, toward which we have striven these many months.”
- Eisenhower’s message to the Allied Expeditionary Force

— 2 hours ago with 518 notes

operationbarbarossa:

On 6 June 1944, the Allied forces opened up a second front in Normandy to liberate France from the German occupation. 90,000 Allied troops landed on the Omaha Beach, codename for Coleville-Sur-Mer. Many were killed by German troops but the Allies managed to defeat the Germans, thus liberating France in the coming months.

Robert Capa, a war correspondent and photographer for LIFE magazine, landed with the 16th Regiment of the 1st Infantry Division on Omaha Beach to photograph the landing. For 90 minutes during the first wave of landings, Capa used four rolls of 35mm film which were to be rushed back to London to make the deadline for the next issue of LIFE.  Unfortunately, all but 11 images were destroyed.  Four of the images are shown here. 

Photos by Robert Capa / Magnum Photos

— 2 hours ago with 132 notes
kt-1r:

Omaha Beach, 6 June 1944.
An American casualty of the morning’s battle (Omaha Beach is the code name for one of the ten sectors of the Allied invasion of German-occupied France in the Normandy landings on 6 June 1944, during World War II).

kt-1r:

Omaha Beach, 6 June 1944.

An American casualty of the morning’s battle (Omaha Beach is the code name for one of the ten sectors of the Allied invasion of German-occupied France in the Normandy landings on 6 June 1944, during World War II).

— 2 hours ago with 48 notes

cumsoline:

BAR (Browning Automatic Rifle) 1918A1, .30-06.

— 2 hours ago with 106 notes